Gwangju Blog

People You Should Know…in Gwangju: Malarkey

 

Photo Courtesy of Malarkey

Photo Courtesy of Malarkey

 

July means double the postings and double the people here at People You Should Know.  So why not kick off the double posts with a multi-person posting?  This segment involves one of the finest bands you’ll see…and hear… in Gwangju.  Covering a wide variety of genres and years, it is my opinion they could probably perform any piece of music and be fantastic at it.  Here, in their own words, is Malarkey….people you should know in Gwangju.

 

 

 

How long have you been in Gwangju?

Wil: I have been in Gwangju since 2010.

Paul: 7 years.

Cat: Malarkey has been a part of the community since mid-2013. Our band members have lived here for varying lengths of time.

Stan: I actually live out in Samho, which is just by Mokpo, where I’ve been since last August. I’ll be leaving the country as of next August.

 

What do you do here in Gwangju?

Wil: I am an ESL instructor for public middle school.

Paul: English Teacher.

Cat: We entertain the Gwangju community (and sometimes the rest of Korea) with fun mix of popular covers and originals.

Stan: I’m an English teacher, like everyone else. In particular, I’m a highschool English teacher who spends an unreasonable amount of time making students write essays, reading essays, giving feedback on essays, grading essays, and then re-grading essays when students aren’t happy first time.

 

What did you do before you took up your current job?

Art by Relja Kojic

Art by Relja Kojic

Wil: Many things. Highlights include pc repair specialist, movie theater projectionist, and domicile relocation logistic consultant. More commonly known as “mover”.

Paul: Musician/Music Teacher.

Stan: Well a while before I came here I finished my MA in Musicology at the University of Bristol, and then I spent a few months playing Europa Universalis IV at my mum’s house while I sent out occasional job applications.

 

What has been your most rewarding achievement?

Wil: completing my language study abroad program in Japan.

Paul: Having a son.

Cat: Getting the opportunity to record high quality tracks in a real studio was, and continues to    be, amazing.

Stan: This is a difficult question. I’m not really sure what parts of my life I should consider achievements, and working out which of those I consider rewarding from that point is frankly mind boggling.

 

What do you do for fun?

Wil: play video games, watch TVprograms, and cartoon series.

Paul: Malarkey.

Cat: Play music and have a couple of beers together at our favorite haunts.

Stan: Drinking, eating fried chicken and pint tubs of Baskin Robbins ice cream, hanging around playing pool while eating free peanuts and drinking water at a bar that apparently doesn’t mind me not buying anything, playing on my 3DS, planning my three months of travel through Asia (which will hopefully include Pyeongyang), and of course coming up to Gwangju to play music and stuff.

 

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve ever done?

Wil: Nothing really all that interesting happens. That could be a matter of perspective though.

Paul: BSc Theoretical Physics.

Stan: This is another really difficult question – what do people find interesting?

Photo Courtesy of Malarkey

Photo Courtesy of Malarkey

 

Any family?  Pets?

Wil: Mother –Marsha Garza, Father- Wendell Rawlins, Sister—Marrissa Rawlins.

Paul: My beautiful wife & son, and several guppies.

Cat: Our drummer and lead guitarist are married. I have a dog and a cat.

Stan: Yes. Not in Korea, though.

 

What is something you wish you could do?

Wil: Be a voice actor for a cartoon series.

Paul: Too many – ranging from buying a new guitar to Space Travel!

Stan: Get ProTools to work on my computer, because that’s been annoying me for ages.

 

Any embarrassing tales for public consumption?

Wil: In band camp me and back in high school me and my friends stage a kidnapping for a fellow band mate so that he could get out of marching practice. We wore ski masks and camouflage. We didn’t get caught specifically, but the entire brass section had to do extra marching next practice.

Paul: One time I accidentally left a spoon in the chopstick compartment of the kitchen drawer.

Cat: We once showed up to a show in Jeonju, ready to rock, and no one came. We played to our wives/girlfriends and the bartender. We still rocked it!

Stan: Shat myself in Paris.

 

Is there any person you admire?

Wil: too many to write about, mainly anyone that I consider close. People who are my family and close friends I draw inspiration and admiration from. All of them display attributes of perseverance and drive. They do this while acknowledging their failing and doing their best to compensate for them. Things like this I find admirable in people.

Paul: Again, too many! But, here’s a few: Jeff Beck, Richard Feynman, Bill Hicks …

Cat: The St. John family. Dave is always keen to help out with sound and to make sure we sound as good as possible. Rachel supports all the artists in Gwangju with her great energy and sound advice. Jeremy provides body armor that keeps us safe from all physical harm.

Stan: No, people are terrible.

 

Any personal code you live by?

Art Courtesy of Jen Lee

Art Courtesy of Jen Lee

Wil: Do my best to try to say what I mean, and mean what I say.

Paul: Go with the flow, and try to be happy.

Stan: I tried “don’t be a dick” but it was too difficult, so now my personal code can be summed up as “eh”.

 

What’s your “perfect” day in Gwangju?

Wil: A day when I go to the movie theater get the most comfiest chair in the theater where I can put my legs up, and watch a show. Followed by (or preceding) visiting a video game arcade and playing games.

Paul: Malarkey at Speakeasy, 4th July.

Cat: Sleeping in, eating at the Alleyway, and then playing a gig at Speakeasy.

Stan:  wake up late, probably brunch hard at Alleyway and order a beer with it because no-one tells me what to do, and then go and get some ice cream for pudding and wander the streets getting funny looks. I probably then wander into an arcade and waste all my coins on air hockey and that funny taiko game. Then I go and get dinner, which is ideally an entire fried chicken, before playing a gig with Malarkey in what turns out to be The Best Gig Ever™. After that I go out and get unreasonably drunk and have the sort of encounters one only has while unreasonably drunk in Gwangju. On my way back to wherever I’m staying, I get a kebab.

 

Is there any place in Gwangju you recommend?

Wil: Yaksaam, Mudeung mountain temple. Has a great view and is very peaceful. I would also recommend Unjusa Temple in Hwasun which is very close to Gwangju city.  Unjusa has a lot of history that some might find interesting.

Paul: I recommend Speakeasy, 4th July, Malarkey.

Cat: Anywhere we’re playing is going to be a fun time. We tend to frequent the bowling alleys and the arcade under H&M.

Stan: The fun migrates around the city as far as I can tell. I’m not here all that often though.

 

What is something you think everyone should do at least once in their life?

Wil: Give an Epic high five.  The kind that stings and the sound echoes.

Paul: Everyone should see Malarkey at Speakeasy, on the 4th July.

Cat: Everyone should try to learn the basics of any instrument. A ukulele is a nice instrument to start with. If not music, find another side of the arts to dabble in.

Stan: I want to say “live outside of the country they were born in” but this could be tricky for some people depending on their situation, so I suppose just travel.

 

Any advice you want to give the people of Gwangju?

Photo Courtesy of Malarkey

Photo Courtesy of Malarkey

Wil: Be excellent to each other.

Paul: Go to Speakeasy, 4th July, and see Malarkey.

Stan: Don’t let non-geeks in. They ruin everything.

What to Do This Weekend: How to Pre-order Universiade Event Tickets

In case you have specific competitions you really want to see, the best idea is to pre-order your tickets for the event. That way you know you will get to see that match, and not have to worry about going to the venue ahead of time to buy your tickets. You can just walk up to the ticketing offices at the venue to buy them the day of, but you are not guaranteed that there will be any tickets available.

Here’s a step by step guide on how to buy your tickets ahead of time over the internet.

First off, which events are you interested in seeing? Let’s start off by checking the official website:

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

It gives you all the facts about general information, News, which sports are featured at the event, the facilities locations, and more.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Under “sports” you can click on the “schedule and results” tab to get to the overall competition schedule.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

The “yellow” highlighted events are times when it is a final event and actual medals will be handed out, which would be a pretty cool time to go to watch.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

This page does a great job of giving you the over schedule for each day and each sport’s events for that day. If you click on the box for the day and sport you want, it tells you the times for the event. It also lists off to the left which Universiade venue where that competition takes place.

To find out where the venue is, click on the facilities tab.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

You are taken to page that fully explains where the venue is,  a map, and photos.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

For tickets, look for the “ticketing now” link on the right.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

 

Look for the sport you want to see, and pick “preliminary, semifinal, final, etc.”

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

At this point you need to either sign in or register an account with Interpark ticketing agency.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Once you create or sign into your account, you can then choose the days for the tickets you want to buy.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Choose the day, the venue, and how many tickets you want.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

Photo capture courtesy of Universiade website.

And from there you follow the rest of the prompts to complete your ticket purchase. You will be sent a confirmation email. Make sure to print it out and bring it with your ID when you pick up your tickets at the box office at the venue.

 

What to Do This Weekend: American Bohemian Yoga Edition

Photo courtesy of Alleycon.

Photo courtesy of Alleycon.

Registration for Alleycon 2015 is now open for the Sept. 18-20 event at the Gwangju Design Center in Bukgu! To register follow this link. For more information about the event, check out the Alleycon website.

The GPP will be around town raising money with their annual International Food Raffle now until July 16. Take a chance on winning a basket of goodies, including favorites from back home like Tim Horton’s coffe, Kraft Mac and Cheese, Cadbury Chocolates, and more! Proceeds will go towards future GPP theater productions, including this summer’s upcoming musical, “The Last Five Years” taking place July 17-19. For more information on where to buy tickets, check out the Facebook event page.

Photo courtesy of Malarkey.

Photo courtesy of Malarkey.

The Salt Art Gallery is hosting Bulgasari Volume 4 July 4 from 4-6:30 P.M. This is an open mic for experimental music and performance. Come and see what it’s all about! Check out the Facebook page for more information.

Ready to celebrate your independence like an American? Catch Speakeasy’s Big 4th of July Bash from 8 P.M.-3 A.M. There will be great music brought to you by two live bands, Gwangju’s own Malarkey, Gypsy Bailey, and drink specials galore. Check out the Facebook event page for more information.

Club Bohemian downtown will host a special punk and hardcore night with Unionway and Victim on their “Wisdom Tour” of Gwangju on July 11. This is a unique collaboration of several members from different ska and punk groups around Gwangju performing as Unionway, including folks from BettyAss, Monkey Pee Quartete, Golden Ticket, and more. There will be a special “Victimshop” merch table at the venue. Doors open at 6 P.M. with a 6:30 show start time. Cover is 15,000 won advance, and 20,000 at the door. For advance ticket purchase go to the website. The first 20 people to book their tickets get a special commemorative button. Also check out the Facebook event page for more information.

Photo courtesy of Salt Art Gallery.

Photo courtesy of Salt Art Gallery.

The Salt Art Gallery is hosting the band “Nice Legs” from Seoul on July 11 at 8 P.M. Just back from a tour of Japan, Taiwan, China, and the U.S., this is their Gwangju debut. Admission is 10,000 won. For more information check out the Facebook event page.

With a special weekday event, the Salt Art Gallery is exploring the “Mysterious World of Free Improvisation” on Monday, July 13 at 8 P.M. The event is part of the One Month Festival. For more information about this event, check out the Facebook page. For more details on the One Month Festival, there’s lots of information on the festival website.

Meg the Yoga Yogi has planned the “Savor Sip Om” social at the Salt Art Gallery July 17 at 6:30 P.M. Along with some Yin Yoga, the event will include dark chocolate mindfulness practice, and some wine to round out the evening. Contact Meghyn at the Yoga Yogi website for details on how to sign up.

The Gwangju Performance project is performing their first musical in their club’s history July 17-19 at Gwangju Art Hall. “The Last Five Years” will be performed one weekend only, so don’t miss out! Tickets are 12,000 won adavance and 15,000 at the door. To reserve your seat send an email to gpptickets@gmail.com. GPP will also be announcing special deals on per-show meals and accommodations soon. For more information check out the  Facebook event page.

Photo courtesy of the Yoga Yogi.

Photo courtesy of the Yoga Yogi.

The folks from Adopt a Child for Christmas Gwangju are planning their first fundraiser of the year July 25. The “Christmas in July” party will take place from 1-5 P.M. at Geumnamro Park downtown and proceeds will go to Adopt a Child for Christmas – Gwangju. Activities tickets will cost 5,000 won for 10 tickets and can be used towards various games, activities and more! Rain or shine. For more information check out the Facebook event page.

 

Essentials with JD # 192 **D-1 GWANGJU UNIVERSIADE 2015 :SCHEDULE + KPOP CONCERT TONIGHT**

최근 업데이트19

D-1 and the games have already started with the preliminaries kicking off this morning. Volleyball, Football/Soccer and Water polo. Most might not be able to visit because of the time but there are some matches happening at night esp Volleyball so go give it a look. English schedules are posted daily at https://www.facebook.com/Gwangju2015.en

 

Also tonight at Chonnam University Sports Complex there will be a Universiade Eve Special with a list of Kpop Starts that just won’t quit!

SHINEE,GIRLS DAY, EXID, 4MINUTE AND MANY MORE WILL BE ON STAGE FROM 8PM. IT IS SUGGESTED TO GET THERE EARLY AS IT IS GOING TO BE CROWDED!

july 2nd univers

ALSO DON’T FORGET THIS HOTLINE IF YOU NEED ANY HELP.  those still having trouble there is a new hotline set up by KT which was posted by Alex Kim

 

We at SK have set up an Information Center for expats and foreigners.

If there’s anything you need to know at all regarding:

KPop concerts, Opening/Closing Ceremonies, directions, ticketing, events, parking, buses, venues, even travel, they’ll help you out.

The number is: 1670-2015

Hours of Operation:

9am – 6pm Until 6/30 | 7/15-16

8am – 11pm from 7/1 ~ 7/14

You can also checkout the website to find our number and other relevant at

www.Gwangju2015.com

Languages supported are:

English Korean Spanish Japanese French and Chinese (Mandarin)

 

LET THE GAMES BEGIN!

 

Peace,

xxl

jjdp

People You Should Know…in Gwangju: Derek Hannon

Photo Courtesy of Derek Hannon

Photo Courtesy of Derek Hannon

If you’ve never met this week’s person, you clearly don’t go out much.  Aside from running one of Gwangju’s most successful pubs…and expat hangout, he’s a great teacher and cornerstone of the community.  Here, in his own words, is Derek Hannon…a person you should know in Gwangju.

 

How long have you been in Gwangju?

I arrived in Gwangju in the spring of 2002, a friend and I got jobs in a kindergarten and we figured on teaching for a year and catching a couple of the world cup games and then moving on somewhere else. Managed the first part, haven’t gotten around to the last part yet.

 

What do you do here in Gwangju?

I teach English in Chosun University, something I love doing and find very rewarding, and I own and run Speakeasy which is an expat bar in Downtown.

 

What did you do before you took up your current job?

Well, before Chosun I got an educator’s education teaching every level from 3 year olds right up to professionals.  If you’re asking about before Korea it’s a long list, I’ve worked in every kind of bar you can think of, a couple of hotels and a few supermarkets. I’ve been a laborer, an abseiling instructor and I put 4 screws in a million computer power surge protectors (felt like a million anyway), I also inputted funeral policies into a computer for a few months, those were happy days!

 

What has been your most rewarding achievement?

If seven years of marriage and two wonderful kids are “an achievement” then that’s it. Life is rewarding if you live it but sometimes just getting out of bed is an achievement.

 

What do you do for fun?

It probably sounds weird but I like to go shopping. Not for clothes ‘cos that’s worse than playing golf in the rain, no I like to wander around those strange interior decorator places between Lotte mart and the train station. My wife and I love going to new apartment open houses with no intention of ever buying one.

 

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve ever done?

Photo Courtesy of Derek Hannon

Photo Courtesy of Derek Hannon

I went skydiving in Australia, not a tandem, we did a full day training to jump and pull the chord ourselves. The evening before the jump the instructors told myself, my 3 Irish mates and one random Mexican that we met to go into town for “a beer” to relax before we jumped in the morning.  The next morning was interesting!

 

Any family? Pets?

My wife and I have two kids, Cathal is 4 and Chloe is 2. The closest thing I have to a pet is my iphone.

 

What is something you wish you could do?

I wish I could speak Korean better than I do, I have enough to get by but the grammar eludes me, that fact I don’t probably keeps me out of a lot of old man arguments though. I wish I could make wishes come true.

 

Any embarrassing tales for public consumption?

In my second year here, I used to go to a local pork restaurant out in Hanam on my own about two or three times a week. I had learned from a friend to say thanks for the good food in Korean, ( Chal magah simni da) and so I said it every time I left the place. About a year later I found out I was mispronouncing it, I was saying “amagah simnida” which translates as “ I didn’t eat anything”. Never went back.

 

Is there any person you admire?

Probably my mother, she was the only child of 8 to leave the small town in Ireland where she was born.  She became a teacher and eventually rose through the ranks to be principal of a large high school. All this at a time,  when it was difficult for a woman to do any of these things in Ireland. While doing all that she had three kids and was perpetually taking me to the hospital for a cut this or a broken that. She is still the smartest woman I know.

 

Any personal code you live by?

Tomorrow is another day.

 

What’s your perfect day in Gwangju?

Wake up late, get up even later, a good fry, take the family out to playland and watch the kids have fun, then Shabu Shabu in downtown, couple of episodes of The West Wing, kids sleeping soundly early.

 

Is there any place in Gwangju you recommend?

Besides the obvious, I’d recommend the new observation deck near the radio station in the evening, it’s nice and cool.

Photo Courtesy of Derek Hannon

Photo Courtesy of Derek Hannon

What’s something everyone should do at least once in their life?

Just one? I could think of a couple of dozen, top five: skydive, bungy jump, get close to an animal that could kill you, make an absolute arse of yourself and get in a proper fight( just to prove to yourself that you could)

 

Any advice for the people of Gwangju?

Get a hobby, find something to do that is not work or study related. This will keep you sane in the crazy world we live in.